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Thread: Resource Books and Fidget Items

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    Resource Books and Fidget Items

    I had purchased Jean Ayres book on Sensory Integration many years ago when her research was first discussed. This book is a classic which has been updated and I still think it is a great resource for families and clinicians. You can purchase it on Amazon.com Sensory Integration and the Child.
    Another great book is The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder by Kranowitz. Also available on Amazon.com.

    Some items I like to keep handy in my office include Koosh balls and nubby balls as fidget items for kids who are touching everything in sight and looking for sensory input. These items also work well to facilitate focus for kids who have attentional issues. My arsenal includes wooden fidget puzzles, beaded bracelets, silly bands, squishy balls, Beanie Babies, bendable figures and handheld bean bags.

    Feel free to add some of your favorites.

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    Great tips Elyse!

    Sensory Integration and the Child is not very expensive on Amazon for $27. 55 new.

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    The Out-of-Sync Child is only $12.57 for Amazon prime members.

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    I also keep a tub of fidgets near by which includes several of items you mentioned. Here are few things to add to the list: feathers, silly putty, paper clips, pipe cleaners, and shells.

    I also purchased these Grab-N-Balls for this year and the kids absolutely love them. They are little pricey ($39.99 for 6) but are durable and will last a long time. I have lent them to classrooms for students who need them across the day.

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    In addition, I haven’t used these but hear Wikki Stix are great for $7.00 a pack on Amazon.

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    Speech-Language Pathologist and Co-Founder of AllSpecialEd.com

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    Fidgit ideas

    A strategy that is good for students who walk around alot/kick while seated is to tie a thera bands (used for exercising) around the front legs of a chair. The student can sit in their chair and get resistance from the band. Additionally, the band is easily removed from the chair and can be sent to other locations with the child.

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    Some more resource books

    I like the book 101 Games and Activities for Children with Autism, Asperger's and Sensory Processing Disorder by Tara Delaney

    http://http://www.amazon.com/Activities-Children-Asperger-2019s-Processing-Disorders/dp/0071623361

    It does not have the background regarding sensory processing that many of the other books have, but it has lots of great ideas (for when you are not feeling so creative!).

    I also like Raising a Sensory Smart Child by Lindsey Biel and Nancy Peske.

    Raising a Sensory Smart Child: The Definitive Handbook for Helping Your Child with Sensory Processing Issues: Lindsey Biel, Nancy Peske: Amazon.com: Books

    I think that this is a great book to share with parents and new therapists.


    For kids, I like Arnie and his School Tools by Jennifer Veenendall.

    Arnie and His School Tools: Simple Sensory Solutions That Build Success: Jennifer Veenendall - Arnie and His School Tools is a delightful and one-of-a-kind book that helps others 'walk a mile in the shoes' of a child with sensory processing d

    I read this with a student this year and we stopped at each page to see if my student thought he felt the same/different as Arnie. There are several other books for kids but I haven't read them yet!

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    Sensory ideas I found on Pinterest

    Creative Playhouse: Over 100 Basic Sensory Materials
    Creative Playhouse: Over 100 Basic Sensory Materials You Probably Have at Home

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    Glowing Sensory Bags
    Glowing Sensory Bag Play ~ Growing A Jeweled Rose

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    Frozen Water Beads
    Frozen Water Beads- Fun Sensory Play ~ Growing A Jeweled Rose

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    Sensory Balloons
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    Sensory Smells
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    Tactile input for students to promote "ready" hands

    One sensory material that I have found somewhat useful for discouraging hand-to-mouth behaviors and promoting "ready" hands is a small square (1ft x 1 ft or so) of artificial grass turf. I usually clamp it to the student's desktop for periods of about 10-15 minutes and redirect the student away from his/her mouth: "If you're looking for something to do with your hands, try exploring what's on your desk!" It seems to help students to focus on the activity at hand, but as always, it's important to change it up so students to get too used to it! One of my students who often is very busy seemed to relax when he explored it with his bare feet, too! Our day is always full of surprises I found some at Home Depot...I had to buy a long strip of it and cut it myself but it was only about $15 for a decent amount!
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    Great Recommendations!!! I love Cate's recommendation to use the astro turf. I have seen it help certain students as well!!

    One of the teaching assistants at my school recently came up with a very unique idea for dissuading hand-to-mouth behaviors. It has been working well for one of our students, and is definitely worth sharing!! The teaching assistant loosely tied mylar sheets to the student’s wrists, letting the end of the mylar extend the length of the student's hand. They make flashy\ fun wristbands, and serve as a reminder to the student of the fun sensory experiences s/he can have with their hands that doesn't include putting them in his/her mouth.

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    Last edited by Colleen; 10-30-2013 at 09:30 PM.
    Speech-Language Pathologist and Co-Founder of AllSpecialEd.com

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